Tasty Tailgating Treats

September 29th, 2016 | Posted by Kimberly Vanderpoel in Kim's Posts | Recipes - (0 Comments)

It’s that time of year! Tailgating, football, and fall!

Tailgating, football, and fall!

Did you know Tailgating doesn’t have to intercept your healthy eating? On today’s Try-It Thursday, we have some tasty tailgating treats that will guarantee a touchdown for a healthy and yummy treat!

Homemade Crunchy Pita Chips with HummusWhite Bean and Bacon Dip with Rosemary Pita Chips

Chips:

  • 1/2 teaspoon dried crushed rosemary
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 (6-inch) pitas, each cut into 8 wedges
  • Cooking spray

Dip:

  • 2 applewood-smoked bacon slices, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/3 cup fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 (19-ounce) can cannellini beans, drained
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot sauce
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon paprika

To prepare chips, combine first 4 ingredients. Arrange pita wedges in a single layer on a baking sheet. Lightly coat pita wedges with cooking spray; sprinkle evenly with rosemary mixture. Lightly recoat pita wedges with cooking spray. Bake at 350° for 20 minutes or until golden.

To prepare dip, cook bacon in a small saucepan over medium heat until crisp. Remove bacon from pan with a slotted spoon; set aside. Add garlic to drippings in pan; cook 1 minute, stirring frequently. Add broth and beans; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer, uncovered, 10 minutes.

Combine bean mixture, onions, and remaining ingredients in a food processor, and process until smooth. Spoon mixture into a bowl; stir in 1 tablespoon reserved bacon. Sprinkle dip with remaining bacon just before serving. Serve with pita chips.

ThinkstockPhotos-178845426Spicy-Sweet Slaw

Slaw:

  • 4 cups packaged cabbage-and-carrot coleslaw
  • 1 1/4 cups red bell pepper, cut into 2-inch strips (1 pepper)
  • 1/2 cup diagonally cut scallions
  • 1 cup halved grape or cherry tomatoes

Vinaigrette:

  • 2 tablespoons prepared horseradish
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil

1. In a large bowl, toss the cabbage-and-carrot coleslaw, red bell pepper, scallions, and grape tomatoes together. Set aside.

2. Combine the horseradish and next four ingredients (through salt) in a small jar and shake until blended. Remove the lid and add the canola oil. Shake again. Or whisk the ingredients together in a small bowl.

3. Pour dressing over the salad and toss to coat vegetables. Serve immediately, or refrigerate until ready to serve.

cooked chicken wings on plateDenis Leary’s Zesty Baked Chicken Wings

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • Dash of cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 16 chicken wings, each halved at joint and with tip removed
  • Cooking spray
  • 1 cup grated fresh Parmesan
  • 6 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 1/2 cups dry whole-wheat breadcrumbs

Dip:

  • 1 cup fat-free yogurt
  • 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/4 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon Worcestershire

1. Combine first 8 ingredients (through lemon zest) in a large bowl, and whisk until combined. Pour over wings, transfer to a zip-top plastic bag, and marinate in the refrigerator for 1–4 hours.

2. Preheat oven to 425°.

3. Line a baking pan with foil. Spray foil with cooking spray; set aside.

4. Mix together Parmesan, parsley, and breadcrumbs in a shallow dish. Coat wings in breadcrumb mixture. Place on prepared pan.

5. Bake on lowest oven rack for 20 minutes, then turn and cook for 10 more minutes.

6. While wings are baking, combine dip ingredients in a small bowl. Serve the wings with the dip

Chicken satay – grilled chicken skewers isolated on white backgroundYogurt-and-Spice Grilled Chicken Skewers

Dipping sauce:

  • 1/3 cup honey mustard
  • 2/3 cup reduced-fat sour cream
  • Marinade:
  • 1 cup plain low-fat yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2-1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Chicken:

  • 1 1/2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts, trimmed of visible fat
  • 12 metal or wooden skewers

1. For the dipping sauce, mix the honey mustard and sour cream in a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate until needed. This sauce can be made up to 2 days in advance.

2. In a small bowl, whisk together all marinade ingredients; set aside.

3. Cut each chicken breast lengthwise into 4 long, thin strips. You should end up with about 12 strips. Place the strips into a gallon-size zip-top plastic bag. Pour the marinade mixture over the chicken, and close the bag. Then flip the bag a few times to ensure that all pieces are coated with marinade, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.

4. When ready to cook, transfer the chicken to a colander to drain off excess marinade. With clean hands, skewer each piece of chicken, threading it onto the end of a skewer. Continue until all of the chicken pieces are skewered.

5. Preheat the grill or grill pan to medium heat. Cook for about 2 1/2 minutes on each side, testing chicken for doneness before serving (meat should be opaque). Transfer skewers to a clean platter.

6. Remove the chicken from the skewers, if desired. Serve chicken while hot with the dipping sauce alongside.

Recipes Source: Health

 

Oat flakes, seeds and branHappy Wednesday! What a beautiful fall day! Did you know September is National Whole Grains Month? So, let’s learn all about grains:

What is a whole grain? 

A grain is considered to be a whole grain as long as all three original parts — the bran, germ, and endosperm — are still present in the same proportions as when the grain was growing in the fields.

various types of cereal grainsWhat foods are in the Grains Group?

Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain is a grain product. Bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, tortillas, and grits are examples of grain products.
Grains are divided into 2 subgroups, Whole Grains and Refined Grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel ― the bran, germ, and endosperm. Examples of whole grains include whole-wheat flour, bulgur (cracked wheat), oatmeal, whole cornmeal, and brown rice. Refined grains have been milled, a process that removes the bran and germ. This is done to give grains a finer texture and improve their shelf life, but it also removes dietary fiber, iron, and many B vitamins. Some examples of refined grain products are white flour, de-germed cornmeal, white bread, and white rice.
Most refined grains are enriched. This means certain B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid) and iron are added back after processing. Fiber is not added back to enriched grains. Check the ingredient list on refined grain products to make sure that the word “enriched” is included in the grain name. Some food products are made from mixtures of whole grains and refined grains.
Whole Wheat vs. Whole Grain – What’s the Difference?

We get asked regularly, “What is the difference between whole wheat and whole grain?” Our answer is another question: “What is the difference between a carrot and a vegetable?”

We all know that all carrots are vegetables but not all vegetables are carrots. It’s similar with whole wheat and whole grain: Whole wheat is one kind of whole grain, so all whole wheat is whole grain, but not all whole grain is whole wheat.

Why is it important to eat grains, especially whole grains?

Eating grains, especially whole grains, provides health benefits. People who eat whole grains as part of a healthy diet have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Grains provide many nutrients that are vital for the health and maintenance of our bodies.
NutrientsSliced whole wheat bread image

  • Grains are important sources of many nutrients, including dietary fiber, several B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and folate), and minerals (iron, magnesium, and selenium).
  • Dietary fiber from whole grains or other foods, may help reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods such as whole grains help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories.
  • The B vitamins thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin play a key role in metabolism – they help the body release energy from protein, fat, and carbohydrates. B vitamins are also essential for a healthy nervous system. Many refined grains are enriched with these B vitamins.
  • Folate (folic acid), another B vitamin, helps the body form red blood cells. Women of childbearing age who may become pregnant should consume adequate folate from foods, and in addition 400 mcg of synthetic folic acid from fortified foods or supplements. This reduces the risk of neural tube defects, spina bifida, and anencephaly during fetal development.
  • Iron is used to carry oxygen in the blood. Many teenage girls and women in their childbearing years have iron-deficiency anemia. They should eat foods high in heme-iron (meats) or eat other iron containing foods along with foods rich in vitamin C, which can improve absorption of non-heme iron. Whole and enriched refined grain products are major sources of non-heme iron in American diets.
  • Whole grains are sources of magnesium and selenium. Magnesium is a mineral used in building bones and releasing energy from muscles. Selenium protects cells from oxidation. It is also important for a healthy immune system.

Health benefits

  • Consuming whole grains as part of a healthy diet may reduce the risk of heart disease.
  • Consuming foods containing fiber, such as whole grains, as part of a healthy diet, may reduce constipation.
  • Eating whole grains may help with weight management.
  • Eating grain products fortified with folate before and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube defects during fetal development.

Tips to help you eat whole grains

Healthy LunchAt meals:

  • To eat more whole grains, substitute a whole-grain product for a refined product – such as eating whole-wheat bread instead of white bread or brown rice instead of white rice. It’s important to substitute the whole-grain product for the refined one, rather than adding the whole-grain product.
  • For a change, try brown rice or whole-wheat pasta. Try brown rice stuffing in baked green peppers or tomatoes and whole-wheat macaroni in macaroni and cheese.
  • Use whole grains in mixed dishes, such as barley in vegetable soup or stews and bulgur wheat in a casserole or stir-fry.
  • Create a whole grain pilaf with a mixture of barley, wild rice, brown rice, broth and spices. For a special touch, stir in toasted nuts or chopped dried fruit.
  • Experiment by substituting whole wheat or oat flour for up to half of the flour in pancake, waffle, muffin or other flour-based recipes. They may need a bit more leavening.
  • Use whole-grain bread or cracker crumbs in meatloaf.
  • Try rolled oats or a crushed, unsweetened whole grain cereal as breading for baked chicken, fish, veal cutlets, or eggplant parmesan.
  • Try an unsweetened, whole grain ready-to-eat cereal as croutons in salad or in place of crackers with soup.
  • Freeze leftover cooked brown rice, bulgur, or barley. Heat and serve it later as a quick side dish.

As snacks:popcorn image

  • Snack on ready-to-eat, whole grain cereals such as toasted oat cereal.
  • Add whole-grain flour or oatmeal when making cookies or other baked treats.
  • Try 100% whole-grain snack crackers.
  • Popcorn, a whole grain, can be a healthy snack if made with little or no added salt and butter.

What to look for on the food label:

  • Choose foods that name one of the following whole-grain ingredients first on the label’s ingredient list:

Whole grain ingredients

  • brown rice
  • buckwheat
  • bulgur
  • millet
  • oatmeal
  • popcorn
  • quinoa
  • rolled oats
  • whole-grain barley
  • whole-grain corn
  • whole-grain sorghum
  • whole-grain triticale
  • whole oats
  • whole rye
  • whole wheat
  • wild rice
  • Foods labeled with the words “multi-grain,” “stone-ground,” “100% wheat,” “cracked wheat,” “seven-grain,” or “bran” are usually not whole-grain products.
  • Color is not an indication of a whole grain. Bread can be brown because of molasses or other added ingredients. Read the ingredient list to see if it is a whole grain.
  • Use the Nutrition Facts label and choose whole grain products with a higher % Daily Value (% DV) for fiber. Many, but not all, whole grain products are good or excellent sources of fiber.
  • Read the food label’s ingredient list. Look for terms that indicate added sugars (such as sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, malt syrup, maple syrup, molasses, or raw sugar) that add extra calories. Choose foods with fewer added sugars.
  • Most sodium in the food supply comes from packaged foods. Similar packaged foods can vary widely in sodium content, including breads. Use the Nutrition Facts label to choose foods with a lower % DV for sodium. Foods with less than 140 mg sodium per serving can be labeled as low sodium foods. Claims such as “low in sodium” or “very low in sodium” on the front of the food label can help you identify foods that contain less salt (or sodium).

bagelWhole grain tips for children

  • Set a good example for children by eating whole grains with meals or as snacks.
  • Let children select and help prepare a whole grain side dish.
  • Teach older children to read the ingredient list on cereals or snack food packages and choose those with whole grains at the top of the list.

Source: Whole Grains Council and Choose My Plate

 

Tis the season for everything pumpkin. We love pumpkin and today are sharing some of our favorite recipes:

IMG_4558Clean Eating Pumpkin Spice Coffee Creamer

  • 2 cupsHalf and half [1]
  • 1/4 cupPumpkin puree
  • 1/4 cupLow sugar maple syrup [2]
  • 1/2-1 tspPumpkin pie spice, to taste [3]
  • 1/2-1 tspGround cinnamon, to taste
  • 1/2 tspVanilla extract[1] Or milk substitute/milk/cream of choice

    [2] Or honey or pure maple syrup

    [3] Or 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg, 1/4 tsp ground ginger, and pinch of ground cloves

    Add all of the ingredients to a small saucepan and whisk to combine. Turn on heat to medium-high, until milk comes to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for an additional 2-3 minutes, whisking occasionally. Remove from heat and add to your coffee, sweetening coffee to your liking. Top with whipped topping and cinnamon if desired. Enjoy!

Recipe and Image Source: Dashing Dish

3756287EatingWell’s Pepperoni Pizza

  • 1 pound prepared whole-wheat pizza dough, (see Shopping Tip), thawed if frozen
  • 1 cup canned unseasoned pumpkin puree
  • 1/2 cup no-salt-added tomato sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 ounces sliced turkey pepperoni (1/2 cup)
  1. Place oven rack in the lowest position; preheat to 450 °F. Coat a large baking sheet with cooking spray.
  2. Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface to the size of the baking sheet. Transfer to the baking sheet. Bake until puffed and lightly crisped on the bottom, 8 to 10 minutes.
  3. Whisk pumpkin puree, tomato sauce and garlic powder in a small bowl until combined.
  4. Spread sauce evenly over the baked crust. Top with mozzarella, Parmesan and pepperoni. Bake until the crust is crispy on the edges and the cheeses have melted, about 12 minutes.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Use leftover tomato sauce and pumpkin to make a second batch of pizza sauce. Refrigerate for up to 5 days or freeze for 3 months.
  • Shopping tip: Look for balls of whole-wheat pizza dough at your supermarket, fresh or frozen and without any hydrogenated oils.

Recipe and Image Source: Eating Well

gluten-free-spiced-pumpkin-wafflesWhole Grain Pumpkin Spice Waffles

  • 2¼ cups  oat flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon allspice or cloves
  • 3 large eggs
  • Scant ⅔ cup milk of choice
  • Scant ½ cup melted coconut oil or 7½ tablespoons butter, melted
  • ½ cup  packed pumpkin puree
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • Suggested toppings: more maple syrup, nut butter and/or toasted nuts, coconut whipped cream…
  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the oat flour, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and all spice or cloves. Whisk to combine.
  2. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk the eggs. Then add the milk, coconut oil or butter, pumpkin purée, maple syrup and vanilla extract. Whisk until the mixture is thoroughly blended.
  3. Pour the liquid mixture into the oat flour mixture. Stir with a big spoon until just combined (the batter will still be a little lumpy). Let the batter rest for 10 minutes so the oat flour has time to soak up some of the moisture. Plug in your waffle iron to preheat now.
  4. Once 10 minutes is up, give the batter one more, gentle swirl with your spoon. The batter will be pretty thick, but don’t worry! Your waffles will turn out great. Pour batter onto the heated waffle iron, enough to cover the center and most of the central surface area, and close the lid.
  5. Once the waffle is deeply golden and crisp, transfer it to a cooling rack or baking sheet. Don’t stack your waffles on top of each other or they’ll lose crispness. If desired, keep your waffles warm by placing them in a 200 degree oven until you’re ready to serve. Repeat with remaining batter and serve with desired toppings on the side.
Reipe and Image Source: Cookie and Kate

Food Safety Myths and Facts

September is National Food Safety Education Month! We found 10 Myths and Facts all about food safety. I’ll admit I thought some of these myths were actual truths. How about you? Did you think any of these food safety myths to be true? 

RefrigeratorCross contamination doesn’t happen in the refrigerator — it is too cold in there for germs to survive! 

FACT: Some bacteria can survive and even grow in cool, moist environments like the refrigerator. In fact, Listeria Monocytogenes grows at temperatures as low as 35.6⁰F! A recent study from NSF International; revealed that the refrigerator produce compartment was one of the “germiest” places in the kitchen, containing Salmonella and Listeria. In your refrigerator, keep fresh fruits and vegetables separate from raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs. Clean your refrigerator regularly with hot water and soap and clean up food and beverage spills immediately to reduce the risk of cross-contamination. Don’t forget to clean refrigerator walls and undersides of shelves!

I don’t need to clean the refrigerator produce bin because I only put fruit and vegetables in there. 

FACT: Naturally occurring bacteria in fresh fruits and vegetables can cause cross-contamination in your refrigerator. A recent NSF International study found that the refrigerator produce compartment was the #1 “germiest” area in consumers’ kitchens. To prevent the buildup of bacteria that can cause food poisoning, it is essential to clean your produce bin and other bins in your refrigerator often with hot water and liquid soap, rinse thoroughly, and dry with a clean cloth towel or allow to air dry outside of the refrigerator.

Close up view of watermelonsI don’t need to rinse this melon for safety — the part I eat is on the inside! 

FACT: Sure you’re not eating the rind of the melon, but there are many ways for pathogens on the outside of the melon to contaminate the edible portion. A knife or peeler passing through the rind can carry pathogens from the outside into the flesh of the melon. The rind also touches the edible portion when fruit is arranged or stacked for serving and garnish. Play it safe and rinse your melon under running tap water while rubbing by hand or scrubbing with a clean brush. Dry the melon with a clean cloth or paper towel.

Assorted Fruits and Vegetables BackgroundI eat a vegetarian diet, so I don’t have to worry about food poisoning. 

FACT: Fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthy diet, but like other foods they may carry a risk of foodborne illness. Always rinse produce under running tap water, including fruits and vegetables with skins and rinds that are not eaten. Never use detergent or bleach to wash fresh fruits or vegetables as these products are not intended for consumption.  Packaged fruits and vegetables labeled “ready-to-eat” or “washed” do not need to be re-washed.

Stacked Leftovers in FridgeLeftovers are safe to eat until they smell bad. 

FACT: Smell is not an indication of whether food is safe to eat! There are different types of bacteria, some of which cause illness in people and others that don’t. The types of bacteria that cause foodborne illness do not affect the taste, smell, or appearance of food. Freeze or toss refrigerated leftovers within 3-4 days even if they smell and look fine. If you’re not sure how long leftovers have been in the refrigerator, toss them. If you’re not sure how old your leftovers are, remember: when in doubt, throw it out!

Freezing food kills harmful bacteria that can cause food poisoning. 

FACT: Bacteria can survive freezing temperatures. Freezing is not a method for making food safe to eat. When food is thawed, bacteria can still be present and may begin to multiply. Cooking food to the proper internal temperature is the best way to kill harmful bacteria. Use a thermometer to measure the temperature of cooked foods.

Close up raw chicken meat drumstick in waterPutting chicken in a colander and rinsing it with water will remove bacteria like Salmonella. 

FACT: Rinsing chicken in a colander will not remove bacteria. In fact, it can spread raw juices around your sink, onto your counter tops, and onto ready-to-eat foods. Bacteria in raw meat and poultry can only be killed when cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature, which for poultry is 165 °F, as measured by a food thermometer. Save yourself the messiness of rinsing raw poultry.  It is not a safety step and can cause cross-contamination! Always use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of your food.

Raw cookie dough mixedOnly kids eat raw cookie dough and cake batter. If we just keep kids away from the raw products when adults are baking, there won’t be a problem! 

FACT: Just a lick can make you sick! No one of any age should eat raw cookie dough or cake batter because it could contain germs that cause illness. Whether it’s pre-packaged or homemade, the heat from baking is required to kill germs that might be in the raw ingredients. The finished, baked, product is far safer – and tastes even better! And remember, kids who eat raw cookie dough and cake batter are at greater risk of getting food poisoning than most adults are.

Close up on an appetizing cheeseburgerOnce a hamburger turns brown in the middle, it is cooked to a safe internal temperature. 

FACT: You cannot use visual cues to determine whether food has been cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature. The ONLY way to know that food has been cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature is to use a food thermometer. Ground meat should be cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature of 160 °F, as measured by a food thermometer.

If I microwave food, the microwaves kill the bacteria, so the food is safe. 

FACT: Microwaves aren’t what kill bacteria – it’s the heat generated by microwaves that kills bacteria in foods. Microwave ovens are great time-savers and will kill bacteria in foods when heated to a safe internal temperature. However, foods can cook unevenly because they may be shaped irregularly or vary in thickness. Even microwave ovens equipped with a turntable can cook unevenly and leave cold spots in food, where harmful bacteria can survive. Be sure to follow package instructions and rotate and stir foods during the cooking process, if the instructions call for it. Observe any stand times as called for in the directions. Check the temperature of microwaved foods with a food thermometer in several spots.

 

Source: fightbac.org

 

Yesterday we learned how good veggies are for you, now let’s try some fun recipes. (Yes, veggies can be fun to cook and eat.)

550_R131094Sunny Broccoli

Steam 3 cups broccoli florets for 5 minutes. Toss with 2 tablespoons orange juice, 1 tablespoon canola oil, 1 clove minced garlic, salt, and pepper. Spoon the broccoli mixture onto clementine slices arranged in the shape of a flower.

550_R131097Crinkly Carrot Fries

Slice 1 pound of carrots into 1/2-inch-wide sticks using a crinkle cutter. Toss with 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Bake at 400 degrees F. for 15 to 20 minutes, or until soft, on a parchment paper-lined pan.

Tip: Great for toddlers 12 months and up.

550_R131102Fiesta Corn

Saute 3/4 cup each chopped red and green bell peppers in 1 tablespoon canola oil on medium heat for 3 minutes. Add 1 1/2 cups frozen corn and cook 2 minutes more. Stir in 1/2 teaspoon chili powder, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1 tablespoon fresh cilantro.550_R131104

Breaded Asparagus

Dip 8 ounces trimmed asparagus spears first in all-purpose flour, then in beaten egg, and then in panko bread crumbs. Drizzle asparagus with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Bake in a single layer at 450 degrees F. for 10 minutes, or until golden. Serve with honey-mustard dip.

550_R131105Teriyaki Green Beans

Cook 3 cups (24 ounces) frozen whole green beans according to package directions. Drain and toss with 2 tablespoons minced shallots, 2 tablespoons light teriyaki sauce, and 1/4 cup toasted slivered almonds.

550_R131106Butterfly Salad

Use a small cookie cutter or scissors to cut a butterfly shape from firm whole wheat bread. Brush both sides lightly with olive oil; toast for 2 minutes, or until crisp. Divide 4 cups torn lettuce, 1 cup halved seedless grapes, and butterfly croutons among plates. Offer dressing on the side.

Photo and Recipe Credit: Parent’s Magazine