Happy Memorial Day

For this week’s Try-It Thursday we are sharing some fun kid friendly meals for your Memorial Day picnic. 
Quinoa & Black Bean Salad

Ingredients

  • ½ cup dry quinoa
  • 1 ½ cups water
  • 1 ½ tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • ¼ teaspoon cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon ground coriander (dried cilantro seeds)
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped
  • 2 medium scallions, minced
  • 1 can (15 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 2 cups tomato, chopped
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 medium green bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 fresh green chilis (or to taste), minced
  • Black pepper (to taste)

Directions

  1. Rinse the quinoa in cold water. Boil water in a saucepan, then add the quinoa. Return to boil, then simmer until the water is absorbed, 10 to 15 minutes. Cool for 15 minutes.
  2. While quinoa is cooking, mix olive oil, lime juice, cumin, coriander, chopped cilantro, and scallions in a small bowl, and set aside.
  3. Combine chopped vegetables with the black beans in a large bowl, and set aside.
  4. Once quinoa has cooled, combine all ingredients and mix well. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Spicy Southern Barbecued Chicken

Removing the chicken fat and skin and adding no salt to the tasty sauce makes this chicken favorite heart-healthy.

3 lb  chicken parts (breast, drumstick, and thigh), skin and fat removed
1  large onion, thinly sliced
3 Tbsp  vinegar
3 Tbsp  Worcestershire sauce
2 Tbsp  brown sugar
to taste  black pepper
1 Tbsp  hot pepper flakes
1 Tbsp  chili powder
1 C  chicken stock or broth, skim fat from top


  1. Place chicken in a 13x9x2-inch pan. Arrange onions over the top.
  2. Mix together vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, brown sugar, pepper, hot pepper flakes, chili powder, and stock.
  3. Pour over the chicken and bake at 350º F for 1 hour or until done.
  4. Baste occasionally.

Fruit Skewers With Yogurt Dip

 

Ingredients

  • 1 cup strawberries, rinsed, stems removed, and cut in half
  • 1 cup fresh pineapple, diced (or canned pineapple chunks in juice, drained)
  • ½ cup blackberries
  • 1 tangerine or clementine, peeled and cut into 8 segments
  • 8 6-inch wooden skewers
  • For dip:
  • 1 cup strawberries, rinsed, stems removed, and cut in half
  • ¼ cup fat-free plain yogurt
  • ⅛ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon honey

Directions

  1. Thread two strawberry halves, two pineapple chunks, two blackberries, and one tangerine segment on each skewer.
  2. To prepare the dip, purée strawberries in a blender or food processor. Add yogurt, vanilla, and honey, and mix well.
  3. Serve two skewers with yogurt dip on the side.

Recipe and Image Source: Family Fun Recipes

DID YOU KNOW?

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

DID YOU KNOW? 

We can help change these numbers.

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the US. In 2011, there were more than 65,000 cases of melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. Melanoma can spread to other parts of the body and causes over 9,000 deaths every year. People who die of melanoma lose an average of 20 years of life expectancy. Melanoma can be caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sun or sources such as indoor tanning. Without additional prevention efforts, melanoma will continue to increase in the next 15 years. We along with our community and policymakers can play a major role in these skin cancer prevention efforts.

Melanoma skin cancer is common and costly.

  • People of any skin color can get skin cancer and people with lighter skin are at higher risk.
  • More than 65,000 melanoma skin cancers were diagnosed in the US in 2011.
  • Melanoma can be disfiguring and even deadly; deaths increase with age and are higher for men than women.
  • The annual cost for treating melanoma has grown faster than the annual treatment costs for all cancers combined.
  • The annual cost of treating new melanoma patients is projected to triple from 2011 through 2030 (from $457 million to $1.6 billion).
  • Using proven community skin cancer prevention programs could prevent an estimated 21,000 melanomas and save $250 million per year by 2030.

Melanoma is increasing.

  • UV exposure causes more than 90% of melanomas in the US.
  • Tans and sunburns are the body’s response to damage from UV exposure. A tan is a sign of damaged skin.
  • More than 1 in 3 Americans report getting sunburned every year.
  • Indoor tanning exposes people to more intense UV rays than the sun. About 6,200 melanomas are estimated to be caused each year by indoor tanning.
  • Nearly 1 of 3 young non-Hispanic white women ages 16–25 uses indoor tanning each year.

What can WE do to protect ourselves?

  • Understand that tanned skin is damaged skin.
  • Wear a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, and other protective clothing outdoors.
  • Find shade, especially during midday hours.
  • Use broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher regularly and reapply as directed. Sunscreen is most effective when used with other sun protection (hats, sunglasses, protective clothing, shade).
  • Avoid sunbathing and indoor tanning.

What can WE do as a community?

  • Increase shade at playgrounds, public pools, and other public spaces.
  • Promote sun protection in recreation areas, including the use or purchase of hats, sunscreen, and sunglasses.
  • Encourage employers, childcare centers, schools, and colleges to educate employees and students about sun safety and skin protection.
  • Restrict the availability and use of indoor tanning by minors.

 

Source: www.cdc.gov

Happy Thursday!

This week is all about biking. In case you missed it, make sure to check out yesterday’s post that shared bike safety tips.

On today’s Try-It Thursday we are highlighting some of South Dakota Bike Trails.

GEORGE S. MICKELSON TRAIL

11361 Nevada Gulch Road
Lead, SD 57754-9801

The trail is 109 miles long and contains more than 100 converted railroad bridges and 4 rock tunnels. The trail surface is primarily crushed limestone and gravel. There are 15 trailheads, all of which offer parking, self-sale trail pass stations, vault toilets, and tables.

More info

Leaders Park

500 N. Leadale Ave. Sioux Falls, SD 57103 View Map

More info

The Sioux Falls Bike Trail

Sioux Falls Bike Trail Loop is around 20 miles and loops around the city. It has multiple access points and the eastern portion of the trail follows along the Sioux River.

More info

Buzzard’s Roost

Black Hills National Forest, SD-44, Rapid City, SD 57702

The Buzzards Roost Trail Network is a system of trails about six miles west of Rapid City that features 8+ miles of diverse single and double track.

More info

Big Sioux Recreation Area

410 W Park St, Brandon, SD 57005

Big Sioux Recreation Area lies on the banks of South Dakota’s Big Sioux River. 2 1/2 mile trail.

More info

Newton Hills State Park

28767 482nd Ave, Canton, SD 57013

Over 6 miles of multi-use trails are open to hikers, bicyclists, and horse riders.

More info

Badlands National Park

Cyclists are often surprised to discover how impressive the Badlands features seem without a windshield to impede the view. From the back of a bike, it almost feels like you can reach out and touch the rugged buttes and twisted spires. Visitors planning on exploring by bicycle should be aware that bicycles are only allowed on designated paved, gravel, and dirt roads within Badlands National Park. As such, they are not allowed on hiking trails, closed roads, off-road, off-trail, or in backcountry areas. The Badlands Loop Road is open to cyclists who prefer a paved riding experience. While bicycles are allowed on the road, it is not without its hazards. The scenic road is narrow with many curves. Traffic is heavy from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Lacking much of a shoulder, recreational vehicles with extended mirrors pose a danger for cyclists riding along the sides of the road. Water is not available along the route and cyclists should avoid dehydration by bringing sufficient amounts with them. Obey traffic regulations and wear bright colors, protective clothing, and a helmet. Several steep passes involving an elevation change of 250 feet in less than 500 meters can be challenging for cyclists not prepared for the experience. Bicycling in the Badlands (74 PDF) outlines suggested routes through the park to maximize downhill sections and offers additional safety messages. Bicycling Off the Beaten Path (51 KB PDF) proposes three routes that take advantage of gravel roads through the park.

More info

What is your favorite South Dakota biking trail?

 

May is National Bike Safety Month

Did you know?

  • Bicycle commuting burns an average of 540 calories per hour.
  • The average person loses 13 lbs in the first year of commuting by bike.
  • A daily 4-mile bike commute will save about 66 gallons of fuel per year
  • If the average person biked to work or shopping once every two weeks instead of driving, we could prevent the pollution of close to one billion gallons of gasoline from entering the atmosphere every year.
  • Since 2000, bike commuting has grown by 62 percent.
  • For a 150-lb woman, bicycling at less than 10 miles per hour, burns about 300 calories in 60 minutes.
  • Bicycling just 20 miles per week reduces women’s risk of heart disease by 50%.

 

Let’s Review Bike Safety

Helmets

Every bike ride begins with putting on a helmet. But it’s equally important that you ensure a proper fit so your helmet can best protect you.

Size can vary between manufacturers. Follow the steps to fit a helmet properly. It may take time to ensure a proper helmet fit, but your life is worth it. It’s usually easier to look in the mirror or have someone else adjust the straps. For the most comprehensive list of helmet sizes according to manufacturers, go the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute (BHSI) Web site at www.bhsi.org.

DECREASING RISK OF CRASHES

Ride your bike responsibly. All States require bicyclists on the roadway to follow the same rules and responsibilities as motorists.

There are two main types of crashes: the most common (falls), and the most serious (the ones with cars). Regardless of the reason for the crash, prevention is the name of the game; there are things you can do to decrease your risk of a crash.

BE PREPARED BEFORE HEADING OUT

  • Ride a bike that fits you—if it’s too big, it’s harder to control the bike.
  • Ride a bike that works—it really doesn’t matter how well you ride if the brakes don’t work.
  • Wear equipment to protect you and make you more visible to others, like a bike helmet, bright clothing (during the day), reflective gear, and a white front light and red rear light and reflectors on your bike (at night, or when visibility is poor).
  • Ride one per seat, with both hands on the handlebars, unless signaling a turn.
  • Carry all items in a backpack or strapped to the back of the bike.
  • Tuck and tie your shoe laces and pant legs so they don’t get caught in your bike chain.
  • Plan your route—if driving as a vehicle on the road, choose routes with less traffic and slower speeds. Your safest route may be away from traffic altogether, in a bike lane or on a bike path.

DRIVE DEFENSIVELY – FOCUSED AND ALERT

Be focused and alert to the road and all traffic around you; anticipate what others may do, before they do it. This is defensive driving—the quicker you notice a potential conflict, the quicker you can act to avoid a potential crash:

  • Drive with the flow, in the same direction as traffic.
  • Obey street signs, signals, and road markings, just like a car.
  • Assume the other person doesn’t see you; look ahead for hazards or situations to avoid that may cause you to fall, like toys, pebbles, potholes, grates, train tracks.
  • No texting, listening to music or using anything that distracts you by taking your eyes and ears or your mind off the road and traffic.
BIKE RIDING SAFETYBy driving predictably, motorists get a sense of what you intend to do and can react to avoid a crash.

Drive where you are expected to be seen, travel in the same direction as traffic and signal and look over your shoulder before changing lane position or turning.

Avoid or minimize sidewalk riding. Cars don’t expect to see moving traffic on a sidewalk and don’t look for you when backing out of a driveway or turning. Sidewalks sometimes end unexpectedly, forcing the bicyclist into a road when a car isn’t expecting to look for a bicyclist. If you must ride on the sidewalk remember to:

  1. Check your law to make sure sidewalk riding is legal;
  2. Watch for pedestrians;
  3. Pass pedestrians with care by first announcing “on your left” or “passing on your left” or use a bell;
  4. Ride in the same direction as traffic. This way, if the sidewalk ends, you are already riding with the flow of traffic. If crossing a street, motorists will look left, right, left for traffic. When you are to the driver’s left, the driver is more likely to see you;
  5. Slow and look for traffic (left-right-left and behind) when crossing a street from a sidewalk; be prepared to stop and follow the pedestrian signals; and
  6. Slow down and look for cars backing out of driveways or turning.

IMPROVE YOUR RIDING SKILLS

No one learns to drive a vehicle safely without practice and experience; safely riding your bike in traffic requires the same preparation. Start by riding your bike in a safe environment away from traffic (a park, path, or empty parking lot).

Take an on-bike class through your school, recreation department, local bike shop or bike advocacy group. Confidence in traffic comes with learning how to navigate and communicate with other drivers, bicyclists, and pedestrians. Review and practice as a safe pedestrian or bicyclist is great preparation for safe riding.

Source: NHTSA

In honor of International Hummus Day on May 13th, we thought we’d share a bit about the health benefits of hummus, and of course, share a few of our favorite hummus recipes.

Health Benefits:

Chickpeas, hummus’s main ingredient, give you protein, good-for-you carbs, and fiber.

Health tips: 

Serve your hummus with veggies like cucumber slices, carrot spears, and red pepper wedges. You’ll get even more nutrition without adding as many calories as a bread, chip, or cracker.

Hummus isn’t just for dipping. It makes a great sandwich spread, too.

Try it instead of mayo. You’ll get more protein and fiber for half the calories you would from mayonnaise.

Hummus adds 1 gram of fat to your lunch box, compared to 5 grams for regular mayo.

 

Recipes

Zucchini Hummus

Ingredients

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 zucchini, chopped
1 cup pinto beans, rinsed and drained
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons tahini
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon salt
Directions

Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Stir in the garlic for 30 second, then add zucchini. Cook and stir until zucchini softens.
Place zucchini, pinto beans, lemon juice, tahini, ground cumin, paprika, and salt in a food processor. Process until smooth.

Spiced Sweet Roasted Red Pepper Hummus

Ingredients

1 (15 ounce) can garbanzo beans, drained
1 (4 ounce) jar roasted red peppers
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 1/2 tablespoons tahini
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
Directions

In an electric blender or food processor, puree the chickpeas, red peppers, lemon juice, tahini, garlic, cumin, cayenne, and salt. Process, using long pulses, until the mixture is fairly smooth, and slightly fluffy. Make sure to scrape the mixture off the sides of the food processor or blender in between pulses. Transfer to a serving bowl and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. (The hummus can be made up to 3 days ahead and refrigerated. Return to room temperature before serving.)
Sprinkle the hummus with the chopped parsley before serving.

Real Hummus

Ingredients

1 clove garlic
1 (19 ounce) can garbanzo beans, half the liquid reserved
4 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons tahini
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon salt
black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil
Directions

In a blender, chop the garlic. Pour garbanzo beans into blender, reserving about a tablespoon for garnish. Place lemon juice, tahini, chopped garlic and salt in blender. Blend until creamy and well mixed.
Transfer the mixture to a medium serving bowl. Sprinkle with pepper and pour olive oil over the top. Garnish with reserved garbanzo beans.

Extra Easy Hummus

Ingredients

1 (15 ounce) can garbanzo beans, drained, liquid reserved
1 clove garlic, crushed
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Directions

In a blender or food processor combine garbanzo beans, garlic, cumin, salt and olive oil. Blend on low speed, gradually adding reserved bean liquid, until desired consistency is achieved.

Recipe and Image Source: http://hummusday.com/hummus/

Health Benefits and Tips: Web MD